Visualise SQLite Data in Power BI

SQLite + Power BI

As the name implies, SQLite is a light weight transactional SQL database engine. It is open-source and free for use either for personal commercial. SQLite is widely used in mobile apps and many other desktop applications that need an internal light weight free SQL database. In this post I explain how to visualise SQLite data in Power BI.

Requirements

To be able to go through the process you need to meet the following requirements:

  • Latest Version of Power BI Desktop (Current version: 2.52.4921.682 64-bit (November/2017))
  • Install SQLite ODBC driver: Make sure you install 64 bit version if your Power BI Desktop is 64 bit version like mine!

Note: You may install both x32 and x64 bit versions of the driver if your other applications are in x32 bit.

  • An existing SQLite database

Note: In case you just want to try this and you don’t currently have a SQLite database you can download a SQLite version of “Internet Sales” of AdventrueWorksDW2016 that I made available for you.

How it works

Like any other Power BI cases, it’s really easy to load data from an existing SQLite database to a Power BI Desktop model. You just need to use ODBC data connection and connect to a predefined “ODBC DNS” OR use a “Connection String”. I’ll explain both methods. After you load data to your Power BI Desktop, you create the relationships then you’re good to go and create flashy reports. Continue reading if you’re interested to an step-by-step guide to visualise SQLite data In Power BI.

Importing SQLite Data to Power BI Using ODBC DSN

  • Open the correct version (x32, x64) of ODBC after you downloaded and installed SQLite ODBC Driver
  • Click “Drivers” tab and make sure SQLite ODBC Driver(s) successfully  installed

ODBC Drivers Continue reading Visualise SQLite Data in Power BI

Import Power BI Desktop Model to SSAS Tabular 2017 Using Azure Analysis Services

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A while ago I wrote a blog post on how to import you currently existing Power BI Desktop models to SSAS Tabular 2016. However, the method I explained is NOT supported by official Microsoft BI tools like SSDT, so you may consider it as a WORKAROUND only until Microsoft supports imploring Power BI models in SSDT. In this post, I show you how to import Power BI Desktop Model to SSAS Tabular 2017 using Azure Analysis Services. It is easy and hassle free.

Requirements

Notes:

  • In this post I do NOT explain how to install Azure Analysis Services
  • This method works only for SQL Server Analysis Services 2017 Tabular

How it works

As mentioned earlier it is really easy in compare with other methods I explained in my previous post. Azure Analysis Services is capable of importing Power BI Desktop files creating a Tabular model version of your Power BI model in the cloud. Then you can simply download Visual Studio project file and redeploy it in your on-premises instance of SSAS Tabular 2017. Let’s go through the steps…

  • Open Power BI Desktop
  • Import data from WorldWideImportersDW from any desired combination of fact tables and dimensions. I imported
  • Create some simple Measures like:

Total Sales = SUMX(‘Fact Sale’, ‘Fact Sale'[Unit Price] * ‘Fact Sale'[Quantity])

  • Save your Power BI Model and close the file
  • Login to your Azure PortalBrowse to your instance of Azure Analysis Services
  • Click on “Open” under “Web designer—preview”

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  • This opens a new page for fabulous “Azure Analysis Services Web Designer”. You’re right, a web designer for tabular models. How cool is that? Smile
  • Click “Add” button under “Models” section
  • Yes, you got it, enter a name for your model and click “Power BI Desktop” button
  • Click “Browse” and select the Power BI file you saved earlier then click “Import”

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Continue reading Import Power BI Desktop Model to SSAS Tabular 2017 Using Azure Analysis Services