Tag Archives: DAX

Role Playing Dimensions in Power BI

In this post I want to explain how to handle role playing dimensions in Power BI. I wrote an article awhile ago regarding role playing dimensions in SSAS Tabular which is valid for Power BI Desktop. But, in this post I show you two new alternative ways to handle role playing dimensions without importing tables, for instance DimDate,  into the Power BI model several times. You also don’t have to create database views on your source database. I show you how to manage this in both DirectQuery and Import modes when connecting Power BI Desktop to a SQL Server database.

I used AdventureWorksDW2016CTP3, but, you can use any other versions of AdventureWorksDW database or you can mimic the process to your own model.

Note: If you are designing a star schema for your data warehouse you can easily create a Date dimension as explained here.

The idea is to manage role playing dimensions in Power BI Desktop itself in the easiest way possible.

Role Playing Dimensions in Import Mode

  • Open Power BI Desktop
  • Get data
  • Select “SQL Server”
  • Enter the server and database names then click OK

Power BI SQL Server Connection

  • Select DimDate and FactInternetSales from the list then click “Load”
  • “Import” mode is selected by default. Click OK

Power BI Connection Settings

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Side-by-side Role-Playing Dimensions In Power BI

Role-playing dimension is one those concepts that is discussed a lot from time to time. I also posted an article about implementing role-playing dimensions in Tabular models. In one my recent posts I used the same concept to implement role-playing dimensions in Power BI. So in this post I’m not going to explain role-playing dimensions in Power BI again.

In some cases you need to have especial calculated measures based on the roles you have in a fact table. One the most common role-playing dimensions is Date dimension. Consider you have to show Internet Sales Amount by Order Date, Due Date and Ship Date in a single chart in your report. In this case, having 3 different date tables won’t help us to achieve the goal. Again I refer to my previous post where I said I keep the original Date table in the model for a reason.

Defining a new Calculated Measure in Power BI Desktop

Basically, what I’m going to explain in this post is using inactive relationships between FactInternetSales table and the DimDate dimension by adding a new Calculated measure. In this case, we’ll be able to show Sales Amount by different roles, well, dates in this sample in a single chart.

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What is new for BI in Excel 2016

It’s been awhile that we are waiting for a sensible improvements in Microsoft self-service BI. The good news is that finally there will be some cool new features added to the next version of Excel which is Excel 2016. By some, I mean, well, there not a lot new BI features, but, some. Something is better than nothing, not too bad though!

Integrating BI features with Excel:

Power View and Power Map:

As you know, Power Pivot was integrated as a built-it feature to Excel 2013. Now I’m really happy that the same thing happened to Power View and Power Map. So you don’t need to install them separately. You can now turn these features on from:

File–> Options–> Advanced-> (scroll down the page) Data-> Enable Data Analysis Add-ins: Power Pivot, Power View, and Power Map

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OR you can still turn them on from “COM Add-ins”:

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Three different approaches for creating a BISM in SSAS 2012, Tabular vs. Multidimensional vs. PowerPivot

SSAS 2012 supports three different approaches for creating a BISM (Business Intelligence Semantic Model):

1. Tabular

a. Uses relational modelling constructs like such as tables and relationships

b. Uses xVelocity in-memory analytics engine for sorting and data calculations

c. Needs to use SSDT (SQL Server Data Tools) to implement

d. Can import data from relational data sources using OLE DB native and managed providers

e. Tabular solutions only support one model.bim file per solution, which means that all work must be done in a single file. Development teams that are accustomed to working with multiple projects in a single solution might need to revise how they work when building a shared tabular solution.

f. support DAX calculations, DAX queries, and MDX queries

g. Tabular model databases can use row-level security, using role-based permissions in Analysis Services (DAX implementation required)

h. It might be not a good choice for the systems that are going to load terabytes of data

Continue reading Three different approaches for creating a BISM in SSAS 2012, Tabular vs. Multidimensional vs. PowerPivot